In this issue
Safety Annual Report published
Public transport says no to racism
New An Post stamps mark heritage of our railway stations
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Public transport says no to racism
Joint campaign - we're all made of the same stuff

Iarnród Éireann, along with Dublin Bus, Bus Éireann, Transdev, Local Link bus services and the taxi industry have united to launch a campaign to challenge racism on public transport.

 

Coordinated by the Immigrant Council of Ireland in partnership with Transport for Ireland and Dublin City Council, it is the biggest anti-racism campaign of its kind in Europe with over one thousand posters displayed during a two week period.

 

Public transport both serves and represents the cultural diversity in Ireland, and prejudice and intolerance are not acceptable.  Iarnród Éireann employees represent 23 different countries of origin, and our customers represent the diversity of Ireland as a whole.

 

Anyone who witnesses or experiences racism on Ireland’s transport system is urged to email stopracism@immigrantcouncil.ie


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New An Post stamps mark heritage of our railway stations

Ireland’s railway stations were celebrated with the issue by An Post of a new four stamp series.


The stamps, accompanied by an attractive mini-sheet and First Day Cover, were designed by Dublin firm WorkGroup and showcase the stunning work of multi-award winning photographer Janice O’Connell of f22 Photography. They are available from main post offices, at Dublin’s GPO and online at www.irishstamps.ie


The stamps offer a new perspective on the stations as seen and used by rail passengers over the years. Each train station occupies a unique place in Irish life, as a much used public utility and as part of a transport infrastructure that spans the State.


The stations featured are Heuston Station, Dublin, a magnificent building designed by English architect Sancton Wood. Originally known as Kingsbridge Station, it opened in 1846. Also, Clarke Station, Dundalk, opened in 1849 and designed by William Hamilton Mill and Kent Station in Cork, originally known as Glanmire Road Station, opened in 1893. The quartet is completed by Bagenalstown Station in Carlow, also designed by Sancton Wood.


The stamps will be eagerly sought by general stamp collectors, and by specialists in transport and rail-related stamps worldwide. They will also prove popular with the thousands of travellers and commuters who use the Dublin, Cork, Louth and Carlow stations chosen to represent the Irish railway stations. 

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